News

2023 • January • February • March • April • May • June • July • August • September • October • November • December 20 21 22 23 24 29

2024 • January 2 4 6 8 13 21 25 • February 6 7 15 28 • March • April • May • June • July • August • September • October • November • December

Email exchange about Groovetech.com Radio, and house and techno in San Francisco in the 1990s

Additions 25 January 2024

By Mikkel Andersen and Thomas (2000 Underground Music)

This article is an exchange of emails regarding Groovetech.com Radio and a comment on the 22 December 2023, that was left on our Discogs comment about Groovetech.com Radio, by Mikkel Andersen (a DJ, producer known as Mod Perron, house and techno lover, and who lived in San Francisco in the 1990s). Other topics include 1990s West coast house crews, the Wicked parties, San Francisco in the 1990s, Nikita nights and great DJ mixes of the past.

On the 22 December 2023, Mikkel replied to 1 of our comments on Discogs, and we liked it so much, that we copied it into our main comment, so people can more easily read it. Then we exchanged some emails, see below. This is what we love, it was a truly amazing interaction, and is 1 of the main reason for doing this website. We are off to a flying start, specialist insider knowledge, we had a real blast, super funny, enjoy!!!

Email 28 December 2023

(Mikkel speaking): Hmmmm, I am at a slight loss on the hidden part, I was under the understanding, that my reply was public. How do I click on the see reply button to see it? Yes I would like you to copy my comment, into your main 1. Your comment on Discogs regarding Groovetech.com Radio, was incredibly thorough and thoughtful.

Email 28 December 2023

(Thomas speaking): Hi, yes on https://www.discogs.com/label/1701027-Groovetech-Ltd you have to (and everyone does, I am not sure it is good design… well it is bad design), scroll to the bottom of my comment, then click the See 1 reply button, then it shows the reply… Not very good design, but I have added it, as it is fantastic. If you do not see it, click reload or refresh in your internet browser, or it should show in a few days. There is sometimes a horrible Discogs post lag of a few days, not sure why…

Email 28 December 2023

(Mikkel speaking): Hey Thomas.

Regarding ‘then click the See 1 reply button’. Oh, yeah, I am aware of that, I get your drift now. My reply is so amazing, and you wanted to bring it to the foreground, so it is better seen. Ha, ha, ha (just kidding).

If I may ask, how in the world did you gain all that knowledge of Groovetech.com Radio? I mean, you went deep. On the flip-side, how did the San Francisco studio miss your radar?

BTW [by the way]… the list of DJs that came in, and dropped mixes at the Groovetech.com Radio San Francisco studio, was way more extensive, than the short list I provided in the reply. I guess that goes without saying, in that I did state ‘just to name a few’. But it was literally ‘everybody and their grandma’ DJ wise, that wanted to get a crack at this brand new thang [thing], that was audio (and video) streaming, on this new thing called the internet.

Groovetech.com Radio logo, has a single vinyl deck onn the left, with a large bold capital letter G, on top. Then the word Groovetech to the right, in large grey capital modern typography.

Some other names I did not drop [mention] were DJ Garth, Markie Mark, DJ Rasoul, DJ Buck, DJ Graeme [Graeme McAllister], and many more. And, they all did it free-of-charge, that was just an added interesting factoid, given DJs rarely DJ’ed free. Al Jay [Alan Jamieson], had so many DJs wanting to come down, he even had a waiting list (week wise). Al Jay is a Scottish DJ and producer, who has travelled the world, bringing the vibe with him wherever he landed. He is what we call an OG [original gangster], starting his interest in electronic music in the late 1980s onwards. With stints in Australia, South America, United States, and Africa respectfully, he now resides in Edinburgh, Scotland area. I have not chatted with Al Jay in some years, and I do not know where, or what he is up to these days…

Markie Mark (Mark Rowley)
Wicked San Francisco parties

Interesting side-note: if you just walked a bit up the hill, from the warehouse and turned right on Haight Street [San Francisco], you came to the most awesome record store, right near the corner, just a building down. It was run by another Brit [British], Darren, who was a dealer and seller of records at Tweekin Records… I always assumed he was the owner, but maybe not??? I never got to know him personally, but chatted with him either at the store, or at various clubs throughout the years in San Francisco. Tweekin Records, I know right? Tweekin… LoL [laugh out loud]. In those days, using names that lent themselves to meth [slang name], was not such a big deal. FFS [for f**k’s sake], we also had 1 of the most amazing clubs at the time, called Spundae, on Sunday nights, that was located in the basement of the 2-story Club DV8 (owned by an oriental named Dr. Winky, although I never really thought he was an actual doctor? LoL [laugh out loud]). I never knew Dr. Winky, I met him once outside Club DV8, as he was parking his Harley-Davidson. Heard from numerous peeps [people] at different times, he was the owner of the Club DV8 and building.

Spundae

I said ‘another Brit [British]’ because as you might know (or not), the San Francisco scene was largely started and made up of countless British transplants [emigrants], that came over the pond, around 1990–1991, to start that thing, we called rave(s). It started with the arrival of Simon Pearson [DJ Simon], but a shortlist would include Tony Hewitt (DJ, and who ran Tango Recordings), Jeno [Jeno Void], Garth [DJ Garth], Thomas [Thomas Bullock] and Markie Mark [Mark Rowley] (of British Tonka Sound System legend) aka [also known as] Wicked parties. Then there were the legendary free Full Moon parties, with Jon Williams, Graeme McAllister aka [also known as] La Paix, in the early years, Shoban, Martin O’Brien (founder of the rave called The Gathering), Malachy O’Brien (co-founder of Come-Unity raves, to which a large amount of the proceeds, always went towards Malachy’s medical needs, as he became permanently disabled, as a result of a tragic van accident, coming back from a Full Moon party, in the wee [small] hours in the early years of the scene)… I am sure I have forgotten 1 or 2. Shoban is a super nice British chick [woman], that came over around the same time most of the other British did. I cannot remember which musical group of Britain she was from (maybe Wicked, Gathering, or Come-Unity). She just came on her own, and meshed with the local British crew, and later, the entire San Francisco scene and vibe. Her name is on numerous flyers, up until the late 1990s.

Garth (DJ Garth, Garth Wynne-Jones)
Markie Mark (Mark Rowley)
British Tonka Sound System
Jon Williams
Come-Unity parties

That vinyl store [Tweekin Records] is still there BTW [by the way], but is now called Vinyl Dreams.

BTW [by the way] nice website. I see you have got an article on the Sunset Crew… they are of course, not to be dismissed when addressing the entire scope of the San Francisco scene.

Email 29 December 2023

(Thomas speaking): Your email is amazing.

In 2000 I did work experience at a website design company in the United Kingdom, it was a great time, with the internet being new. When I was there, I came across a design blog called Kaliber10000, you know, a design blog for website designers, and once a week, they would do a post saying, xyz [whoever it may be] was playing on Groovetech.com Radio, so I checked it out, and the rest is history. I have nothing but 100% respect for Groovetech.com Radio.

Regarding ‘How come I missed the San Francisco studio’, hmm not sure, I think I did not notice it shown somehow, but really interesting to know.

I could write for hours about Groovetech.com Radio.

I cannot thank you enough for your email. Yes it was a great time in the 1990s, with all the old guys, I still love it.

Here are some things you may like:

Your information is great, I know about Spundae, here is a real booming mix:

Regarding ‘Simon Pearson (DJ Simon)’, yes I know about him, yes very good, so he was called just ‘Simon’ I think? Yes his old mixes are good.

I think it was a great time, but the information gets lost. Old mixes do get uploaded to SoundCloud, Mixcloud, YouTube and so on, like the Mixtape Magic archive https://www.youtube.com/@MixtapeMagic, so that is good, it was an amazing time, so special and valuable, I still listen to it and love it.

Let’s keep in contact, hey!!!

Email 29 December 2023

(Mikkel speaking): Ah yes, Jim Hopkins, purveyor [person who sells or deals in particular goods] of archiving everything mix-wise. He is an amazing fella.

Jim Hopkins and his San Francisco Disco Preservation Society

Thanks for all the links… I will check them out. As I am off work this morning, I have already checked out some of the videos of Groovetech.com Radio, London studio, and perused [looked at] your other links. Nice 1 mate.

Funny thing in 1999–2000, I was going to San Francisco State University, for an industrial technology degree, with emphasis on graphic communication design. I never finished (and a ‘never mind’ story). I remember some website design courses I took, where we were learning Adobe [Macromedia] Dreamweaver software. I just remember learning about the golden rule of never being 3 clicks away, from the homepage, and how many websites today miss that point. UGH!!!! [like ugh, it was horrible]. Maybe it is mostly a Danish thing, but FFS [for f**k’s sake]. There are still many websites where you fall into a rabbit hole, and you cannot get out, and have to start over. Some websites are 3 clicks away, but the home button is so not readily available or seen, and it amounts to the same result. WTF? [what the f**k].

Adobe [Macromedia] Dreamweaver software

Yeah, Nikita night at 1015 Folsom club, was an off-shoot of Spundae, ran by Peter [Peter Beckers] and Geve [Guiv Naimi], the 2 Germans that came to San Francisco in the early 1990s. Both were amazing dudes. They also had a 1-off night called Nation, at Sound Factory (San Francisco’s super nightclub). My buddy Peter Fable DAT’ed [recorded] both rooms, including Sasha’s 1st appearance on the West coast [America]. This set [mix] and the 1st 90 minutes, I consider 1 of the most perfect mixes EVER. I managed to get a tracklist (tracks 1–10 or so, see below), and I slowly bought all of them in vinyl format. OMG! [oh my god]. Sasha dropped some serious heat. Sound Factory (owned and ran by a kool kat [cool person] named Dave Dean), touted as having the most awesome sound system, $1 million to boot [meaning as well, or in addition]. If there was a more perfect sounding sound system, I do not know where.

1015 Folsom club, San Francisco

Funny story: my girlfriend and I, once sat on 1 of the 4 subwoofers on the edge of the dance floor, in the main room. We were cradled together (high…), and she was sitting right on the left edge (with her legs straddled down the front side), when she leaned back and whispered in my ear […] (well I cannot tell you what she said…), but she was aroused… I was like, ‘OMG [oh my God], that is so awesome! I am really happy for you’. True story.

Funny sidenote is: I was amazed by Sasha’s opening track, that of course is the a cappella version of The Book tune (released in 1994), and it was not until I was listening to the B-side of the same vinyl (that I had for many years), that it occurred to me, it was Sasha’s opening track. Mind blown!!! (laugh, laugh).

The Book by Salt City Orchestra. Paper Recordings, UK 1995

Anyhoots [anyway], here is Sasha’s set:

Sasha Live @ Nation (Sound Factory) Main Room, San Francisco, 3 July 1995

Tracklist for: Sasha at Nation, Sound Factory, San Francisco, 3 July 1995

  • Salt City Orchestra – The Book (Epilogue Reprise).
  • Libra Pres. Taylor – Anomoly (Calling Your Name).
  • Eddie Lock versus Dave Valentine – The DJ Dubs (Mix 1).
  • Rhona Johnson – Keep Lookin Up (FOS).
  • Microman – Microhouse.
  • London Beat – Build It With Love (The Boss Parts 1&2).
  • Spacer IV – Arc 3.
  • B-Tribe – Nanita (BTs Voltaire Organica Mix).
  • Speedy J – G Spot (J Spot Mix).
  • Blue Amazon – The Blessing.
  • BT featuring Vincent Covello – Loving You More (BT Garden Of Ima Dub).
  • BT featuring Vincent Covello – Loving You More (BT Primordial Sound 12″ Vocal Mix).
  • Blue Amazon – No Other Love (Original 12″ Mix).
  • MBG – Lithium.
  • Grace – I Want To Live (Rollo & Sister Bliss Big Vocal Mix).
  • BT – Tripping The Light Fantastic.
  • Spicelab – We Got Spice (Humate Mix).
  • Pete Lazonby – Sacred Cycles (Gary 138 D Mix).
  • Billy Ray Martin – Running Around Town (BT Jacob’s Ladder Mix).

BTW [by the way], 1015 Folsom club [San Francisco] is an interesting story. Gay bathhouses [saunas], that got shut down abruptly due to the AIDS crisis, in the later-half of the 1980s. All those bathhouses became clubs [nightclubs], so to speak; there were several in San Francisco. Before being completely encased in 3 feet of concrete (or get permanently shut down by the city due to excessive noise complaints by the neighbours), 1015 Folsom’s main floor actually had windows making up the rooftop that could open up. A guy named Preston (Preston Lytton of Toon Town rave fame), had a Sunday morning party there, called Groove Kitchen… Just an amazing come down Sunday morning party, especially with the open rooftop and sunshine (where that was allowed, of course). We used to go back‘n’forth from there, to The EndUp nightclub, that was literally about a block‘n’a-half-away on 6th and Harrison Street. Preston was a super cool dude, also a DJ, but mostly a promoter. As I alluded to before, I confused Groove Kitchen with Boogie Buffet as it pertains [refers] to 1015 Folsom, although I found some flyers of Groove Kitchen that had Stompy Stomp as a collaborator, so I got to thinking Preston was also behind Groove Kitchen in some form or fashion. Groove Kitchen was a smaller party that usually dropped at the huge mega-club Club Townsend, on 177 Townsend Street. The ones I went to, were located in the backside of the larger club, just a smaller venue, from the main dance floor. What Preston did, at 1015 Folsom club on Sundays, was the Boogie Buffet event. Preston also would later do a rave type club party, called Stompy Stomp. Come to think of it, he may also have been behind Groove Kitchen (I just do not have that information and I just cannot remember).

1015 Folsom club
Groove Kitchen
Boogie Buffet
Stompy Stomp
Photograph of the front of the building, that is in a white sort of Art Deco style, shows the pavement and road at the front, with cars along the road.

Front of the EndUp nightclub building, that is in a white sort of Art Deco style, shows the pavement and road at the front, with cars along the road.

Photograph by Blackguard SF (19 February 2015), distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 Deed license, adapted, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_EndUp.

1 of the other bathhouses (I think, if I remember correctly) that became clubs, is on 11th Street, the Oasis nightclub (legendary DNA Lounge being another 1 of them, down the street), had a raised dance floor, that amounted to a plastic sheeting see-through flooring, just put on top of the still pool (filled with water), and surrounded by lighting around the edges.

Photograph of the front of the DNA Lounge, shows the street outside, entrance and various signs around and above the entrance.

Front of the DNA Lounge nightclub building, shows the street outside, entrance and various signs around and above the entrance.

Photograph by Kaldari (9 June 2018), distributed under a CC0 1.0 Deed license, adapted, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA_Lounge.

I once had a nice chat with Microman (aka [also known as] Mathtiiaas Rosen) about his Plumphouse number 1 track, and its incredible snare sound. I just HAD TO KNOW how he got that snare sounding so tight‘n’crisp!!! Although Mathtiiaas did not give up the sample, he essentially said it was just an 808 snare, with an adjustment (fine-tuning off) of the transient. Mind blown (again).

Anyhoots [anyway], Microman is still making music here and there… check him out. His tracks are historically 24-bit, if you get to download any, and so on. Seems like you have got me started on rambling on and on, and on… Sorry mate, but you are reaching out, has gotten my dusted old memories to the forefront, and I just cannot help myself.

Let’s stay in touch.

Email 29 December 2023

(Thomas speaking): Hi, really enjoyed your emails.

Well as it happens, yesterday I launched the 1st final version of https://2000undergroundmusic.com.

How would you feel about me editing slightly, and proofreading your emails, and then making them into a blog post, on the news section on the https://2000undergroundmusic.com website. Full credit and links to you, of course. I can link to your SoundCloud, Bandcamp and Discogs.

I can copy all the emails into a .docx, and then edit, send you a 1st version, to check and read, before it goes on the news webpage. What are your thoughts?

Think it is great history knowledge. I cannot thank you enough, thank you so much for your time.

Email 30 December 2023

(Mikkel speaking): Hey Thomas.

Well shucks [cannot believe it]… sure, go ahead with a proofread, editing and blog post. GREAT idea, and I did not think my information, would amount to such an interest, but who am I to judge? I could elaborate on the edits, if you want to clarify any of the information that needed addition(s). Sounds interesting and exciting, I have not actively participated in something like this in years, so I welcome the opportunity.

If you want to really know more about me, go check out the remains of my original DJ collection, and some that I have accumulated since moving back to Denmark, in 2016. An old saying goes something to the effect of ‘Wanna [want to] really know someone, find out what their taste in music are’, sumn’ [something] to that effect, right? My collection is chalk-full of nothing but bombs, and encapsulates techno, house, trance, and even psy-trance (then called Goa trance), as far back as late 1980s, to about 2005–2006, (although the majority is up to about early 2000s). I gave the remaining 1000+ records I had, to my old buddy Jason, before I moved, did not have the funds or energy to get them shipped across the Atlantic ocean. Sad part is, Jason passed away due to a motorcycle accident, about 3 years ago. BUT, on the flip-side, my best friend Peter inherited Jason’s entire collection (including mine), when Jason’s mum needed someone to curate (and not just sell and throw out) Jason’s vinyl, and keep him alive (in that respect). Here is the link to my entire collection I have to hand: https://www.discogs.com/user/ModPerron/collection. BTW [by the way]… this dude started possibly the largest curation of rave and club flyers ever. He is an old head from the San Francisco Bay Area, and I got to email with him, a few times in the beginning of his endeavour. What started as only San Francisco Bay Area flyers, is now, if my memory serves me right, worldwide?

Rave Preservation Project

Kinda [sort of] like Discogs, which started with the dude just wanting to enlighten the United States, to the details and information of music records and releases.

I also remember emailing with the founder of Discogs as well, telling him he had started a holy grail, and how excited I was. I cannot remember how I found him, but I did. This would have been within the 1st year he started Discogs. I mean without him and Discogs, I would have NEVER found out that TZ (Test Zone) record label was actually a secret R&S [research and study] sublabel, as there was no information on any of the vinyls at all!

TZ (Test Zone) record label

Or the countless aliases artists had back in the day, and their actual names were not listed on the record… even in the cases where a producer’s name, was just a letter and a last name. Or artists’ connection to labels, as in an artist was also the founder of a label, stuff like that. Discogs opened my mind, and allowed me to make connections, I normally would not have been able to make otherwise.

I was actually at this amazing morning set [mix] from John Howard, on 23 November 1993. It was dropped in what we called the dark room, a side-room of the previous mentioned main-floor. The dark room also had straight house sets [mixes], while the main-floor was usually down-tempo, reggae, funk, where they also served free-of-charge fruits and vegetables… and a full bar. The main-floor was for chillaxin’ [chilling out and relaxing] and recouping from a long weekend, of raving, clubbing and partying.

DJ John Howard at Boogie Buffet (Bite Down On That Phat Slice Of Groove), 23 November 1993, 1015 Folsom club, San Francisco, on Sundays

Here is another 1 of my top 5 all-time sets [mixes], a masterfully tailored band layered mix, with the perfect building blocks from deep house to up-tempo house. John Howard really knew what he was doing, and was a mainstay in the San Francisco scene for years, including pounding out some productions himself.

DJ John Howard – Live at Boogie Buffet, 28 November 1993 – Bite Down on That Phat Slice of Groove (Jim Hopkins Remaster)

The following Sunday, John Howard was there again, with recorded tape cassettes of that previous Sunday. I bought a copy and still have it. Enjoy this 1, it is a fantastic set [mix].

Email 30 December 2023

(Thomas speaking): Yes the 2 tunes at the end of the DJ John Howard at Boogie Buffet (Bite Down On That Phat Slice Of Groove), 23 November 1993, 1015 Folsom club, San Francisco mix. So the jazzy instrumental 1 playing at 77 minutes, it is stunning, what… bordering into something like jazz house? And then the 2nd from last tune of the mix, the organ and xylophone tune playing at 85:40 minutes, what freestyle organ and xylophone jamming, crazy, yeah, still good, I still love it, not done yet, I never hear it done these days (maybe I am a relic? and not in touch with the present?).

I cannot thank you enough, we love this stuff, thanks a lot! Priceless.

Ending quote

I would like to end with a quote, that I have not remembered for about 24 years, it was by Jean Giraud who was a French artist, cartoonist and writer, who worked in the Franco-Belgian bandes dessinées (BD) tradition (Franco-Belgian comics). It was on an edition of Channel 4’s Hot Reels: Animation show in 2001 [exact show not yet known, but I will try and find the exact reference]. He said something like:

‘I forget to pay my bills, I forget to pay my taxes, I forget what I am doing, I forget to telephone my wife, I forget everything that is going on around me, when I draw and animate…’.

Channel 4’s Hot Reels: Animation show

© Copyright applies.

Article publishing and further details

We love to publish good:

  • Articles.
  • Email exchanges.
  • Expert knowledge.
  • Lists.
  • Photo documentaries.
  • Reviews.

How we can help

We work directly with you on editing, proofreading, image editing and formatting, graphic communication design, and improving the content.

Longevity

Articles are kept on this website for a long time, 10+ years, in a consistent place, and for as long as the website is online, so they have a good home.

Payment

We do not currently pay for content, due to lack of cash, overheads and running costs, but can certainly link to you. We need to think about how we can do this in the future.

Authors retain the copyright, or joint copyright if there is more than 1 author of the article. We ask for a reuse license.

Copyright for reusing content

Any images used will be copyright of the stated maker or photographer.

For text content, you are allowed to reuse and quote, about 500 words of an article for free without permission. But you must always credit the article title, URL, authors and our website name. If you wish to reuse and quote any more than 500 words, you need to pay a small 1-off reuse fee, contact us. The fee then goes to the authors.

[Text in square brackets]

We describe and expand abbreviations and other terms, that would not be commonly understood inside square brackets [ ], so the text can be more widely understood. They act like a higher‑level outside voice.

Faulty content or if you are not pleased

If you spot any errors, incorrect facts, or something you are not keen on or displeases you, please contact us and we would be happy to discuss it with you. We try to make the content as friendly and least offensive as possible, and also use inclusive language.

Ability to convert images or pixel PDFs into editable electronic text

We also have the skills to convert old printed articles, that have text as an image, into electronic editable text, the technical term is OCR (optical character reading) scanning, that converts text that is not editable or is as a pixel image, into electronic text, that is editable.

Contact us, or contact authors

Any issues contact us, and we can forward on any emails to authors, that is fine.

Thanks for reading!